the-eldest-woman-on:Photographer: Ryan McGinley
In the past few weeks, my editorial absence has been due to sorting through the entries we received into our show! After much deliberation, we decided on 6 brilliant artists… stay tuned for more show details!
In the meantime, I’d like to share ebullient photographer Ryan McGinley for your viewing pleasure. The youngest artist to show solo at the Whitney, his portfolio extends across the music, fashion, and fine art world. Making his name photographing young nudes joyously raucous in wild nature, McGinley has a preference for the untamed. Inasmuch, his work is edgy and confrontational; even so, the spirit of his images remains very grounded in living for the moment, with all the bruises, cuts, and embarrassing moments that come with the learning process. Often posed with animals, McGinley photographs his models tenderly, mirroring the primal need for joy experienced both within his human and mammalian subjects. What remains most impressive, however, is the pared-down composition of his photographs. Though color - fireworks, natural lighting, stars, or paint - emanates through the vast majority of his works, even his black and white images are stark yet lively. The imperfect model is almost always in communion with nature, framed in a setting that dwarfs and encompasses all of romantic life. For that reason, the celebration of the natural world is expressed so perfectly in McGinley’s work that, indulge me for a moment, it’s my foremost wish in life to curate a show of his one day. Until then, please investigate his pervasive and awe-inspiring work; it will leave you breathless. 

the-eldest-woman-on:
Photographer: Ryan McGinley

In the past few weeks, my editorial absence has been due to sorting through the entries we received into our show! After much deliberation, we decided on 6 brilliant artists… stay tuned for more show details!

In the meantime, I’d like to share ebullient photographer Ryan McGinley for your viewing pleasure. The youngest artist to show solo at the Whitney, his portfolio extends across the music, fashion, and fine art world. Making his name photographing young nudes joyously raucous in wild nature, McGinley has a preference for the untamed. Inasmuch, his work is edgy and confrontational; even so, the spirit of his images remains very grounded in living for the moment, with all the bruises, cuts, and embarrassing moments that come with the learning process. Often posed with animals, McGinley photographs his models tenderly, mirroring the primal need for joy experienced both within his human and mammalian subjects. What remains most impressive, however, is the pared-down composition of his photographs. Though color - fireworks, natural lighting, stars, or paint - emanates through the vast majority of his works, even his black and white images are stark yet lively. The imperfect model is almost always in communion with nature, framed in a setting that dwarfs and encompasses all of romantic life. For that reason, the celebration of the natural world is expressed so perfectly in McGinley’s work that, indulge me for a moment, it’s my foremost wish in life to curate a show of his one day. Until then, please investigate his pervasive and awe-inspiring work; it will leave you breathless. 

(Source: ru-glamour.livejournal.com)

atm0sphericist:

Vija Celmins - Untitled (Big Sea)  Graphite drawing

So, in the wake of Hurricane Sandy, we wish you all the best as you recover from the storm or rejoice in having been missed by its brunt. Regardless, our thoughts are with you. So, in turn, today is a day to focus on something more calm, something reassuring: the meditative work of Vija Celmins. Her drawings and paintings are so meticulously rendered; inasmuch, she seems to breathe an entirely new life into the photo-real tradition. Typically depicting washed-out subjects, her work is reminiscent of old sepia-toned photography: singular and relentless, yet soft, in its focus. In fact, her works often depict very simple subjects, from rocks to spider webs to oceans, that to the naked eye seem commonplace; under Celmins’s microscopic study, however, these objects become so much more startlingly complex than most of us would ever have dreamed. To think that such levels of detail can come solely from the marks of a pencil!
Given this level of detail, it’s hard to imagine how her work could be anything but process-driven. Of course there remains a level of abstraction to the small-scale work, but the precision of her technique always grounds us firmly in reality. Contemplatively, we place ourselves beside the artist: we consider her own observations, and we ourselves become more attuned to the details not only of her drawings, but of all life, all nature - if only for a moment. She captures one pristine second in space, forever memorializing its grandeur, and, despite all the ways that things change from that initial snapshot to the time the final piece hangs in a gallery, she reawakens us to the magnificent, chilling, and overwhelming presence of time in the cosmos.

atm0sphericist:

Vija Celmins - Untitled (Big Sea
Graphite drawing

So, in the wake of Hurricane Sandy, we wish you all the best as you recover from the storm or rejoice in having been missed by its brunt. Regardless, our thoughts are with you. So, in turn, today is a day to focus on something more calm, something reassuring: the meditative work of Vija Celmins.

Her drawings and paintings are so meticulously rendered; inasmuch, she seems to breathe an entirely new life into the photo-real tradition. Typically depicting washed-out subjects, her work is reminiscent of old sepia-toned photography: singular and relentless, yet soft, in its focus. In fact, her works often depict very simple subjects, from rocks to spider webs to oceans, that to the naked eye seem commonplace; under Celmins’s microscopic study, however, these objects become so much more startlingly complex than most of us would ever have dreamed. To think that such levels of detail can come solely from the marks of a pencil!

Given this level of detail, it’s hard to imagine how her work could be anything but process-driven. Of course there remains a level of abstraction to the small-scale work, but the precision of her technique always grounds us firmly in reality. Contemplatively, we place ourselves beside the artist: we consider her own observations, and we ourselves become more attuned to the details not only of her drawings, but of all life, all nature - if only for a moment. She captures one pristine second in space, forever memorializing its grandeur, and, despite all the ways that things change from that initial snapshot to the time the final piece hangs in a gallery, she reawakens us to the magnificent, chilling, and overwhelming presence of time in the cosmos.

devidsketchbook:

Kohei Nawa   ”PixCell-Elk”

Nawa’s beaded PixCell collection is generally made up of taxidermy animals or other natural items bedecked with varyingly-sized, transparent glass orbs. The distortions created by the application of glass beads to an object convey a very delicate balance between organic and inorganic processes. On first look, there appears to be something hyper-natural in these sculptures: the glass beads resemble perfect drops of glistening dew that have consumed the animal mid-action. Looking deeper, the beads clearly create a barrier between the animal and the audience; the orbs cast an alternate composition of the animal. Our minds are left to contemplate the extent to which the presented image can be trusted and deciphered.

Of his PixCell, Nawa reports on his website (in broken English) that “by covering [the] surface of an object with transparent glass beads, the existence of the object itself is replaced by ‘a husk of light’, and the new vision [becomes] ‘the cell of an image’.” The glass beads intentionally mystify the appearance of the animal and Nawa seeks to recreate the “cell of an image” as the means to perpetually distance the viewer from reality through recreating the process of pixelation.This commentary on consumerism and the hyper-distortion of natural processes is a powerful statement on the post-modern nature of reality. Though pristine and beautiful and spell-binding, Nawa’s images also conjure up mischief and uncertainty: ultimately, he asks us to consider the nature of perceived reality. What is the dynamic of natural life?

meta-math:

Kiki Smith- Wolf Girl (1999)

After a successful weekend of hanging flyers, I think it’s a good time to sit down and ruminate on some amazing artwork. We met so many kind people in Frederick this weekend, and we look forward to them graciously spreading the word about our upcoming show!
As we wait, we’ll be focusing our attention on more publicity for the event - and I personally will be spending a great deal of time on this blog, keeping you - our potential gallery-goers - up to date about the world of contemporary art. A personal favorite of mine, Kiki Smith is starting point for this introduction.
Her work addresses the gender-bias toward “handicraft” head-on and, inasmuch as she confronts this art historical misconception, she delineates for a us a clear image of what it means to be a postmodern artist. Once thought to be second rate or lowbrow art, textile design and other more “matronly” arts were seen as disposable and trite. Yet the tendency to depict natural (feminine) imagery in the works of male artists was the accepted gold standard. As the 21st century unfolded, women found it such a double standard increasingly unacceptable. Women were frowned upon by the art establishment when they previously sought to communicate the female experience through craft; however, thanks to the innovative and socially-aware work of artists like Kiki Smith, this barrier has been slowly breaking down.
Not only is Smith’s artistic portfolio full of beadwork, textile/fiber design, and other looser print media, her subject matter is also decidedly feminist. She focuses on the female body and folkloric depictions of the female identity in her oeuvre. Through using heroine-models like Alice in Wonderland and wolf-like girls, as in the image here, Smith asserts the power and experience of women through heavy reliance on naturalistic themes. Women are not simply “one with nature” or an extension of mother nature, merely a fixture of the landscape; instead, Smith depicts them as active participants in their own fates that inhabit a world of their own creation.
Muted colors often emphasize the austerity and strength of these characters, and men are almost never shown. As a result, wolf-girls retain an otherwordly beauty: they are depicted tenderly and delicately, as if Smith is drawing her own smiling child. What has typically been seen as freakish to a male-ordered society is drawn with utmost care; the unrelenting gaze of the girl, with her small-toothed smile, suggests self-acceptance. She is no Venus, but that does not negate her worth. In typical deconstruction theory, the archetypal beauty is supplanted by the minority group. There is no idealization whatsoever; therein lies the power of Smith’s visionary work.

meta-math:

Kiki Smith- Wolf Girl (1999)

After a successful weekend of hanging flyers, I think it’s a good time to sit down and ruminate on some amazing artwork. We met so many kind people in Frederick this weekend, and we look forward to them graciously spreading the word about our upcoming show!

As we wait, we’ll be focusing our attention on more publicity for the event - and I personally will be spending a great deal of time on this blog, keeping you - our potential gallery-goers - up to date about the world of contemporary art. A personal favorite of mine, Kiki Smith is starting point for this introduction.

Her work addresses the gender-bias toward “handicraft” head-on and, inasmuch as she confronts this art historical misconception, she delineates for a us a clear image of what it means to be a postmodern artist. Once thought to be second rate or lowbrow art, textile design and other more “matronly” arts were seen as disposable and trite. Yet the tendency to depict natural (feminine) imagery in the works of male artists was the accepted gold standard. As the 21st century unfolded, women found it such a double standard increasingly unacceptable. Women were frowned upon by the art establishment when they previously sought to communicate the female experience through craft; however, thanks to the innovative and socially-aware work of artists like Kiki Smith, this barrier has been slowly breaking down.

Not only is Smith’s artistic portfolio full of beadwork, textile/fiber design, and other looser print media, her subject matter is also decidedly feminist. She focuses on the female body and folkloric depictions of the female identity in her oeuvre. Through using heroine-models like Alice in Wonderland and wolf-like girls, as in the image here, Smith asserts the power and experience of women through heavy reliance on naturalistic themes. Women are not simply “one with nature” or an extension of mother nature, merely a fixture of the landscape; instead, Smith depicts them as active participants in their own fates that inhabit a world of their own creation.

Muted colors often emphasize the austerity and strength of these characters, and men are almost never shown. As a result, wolf-girls retain an otherwordly beauty: they are depicted tenderly and delicately, as if Smith is drawing her own smiling child. What has typically been seen as freakish to a male-ordered society is drawn with utmost care; the unrelenting gaze of the girl, with her small-toothed smile, suggests self-acceptance. She is no Venus, but that does not negate her worth. In typical deconstruction theory, the archetypal beauty is supplanted by the minority group. There is no idealization whatsoever; therein lies the power of Smith’s visionary work.

Rolling Along

Happy Thursday everyone!

Just a quick update, but we got our first submission yesterday! How wonderful! I just want to continue to thank everyone for all their help on this endeavor! Check back soon for more artist news.

For now, let this be the quote of the day…

Art is a harmony
parallel with nature.

-Paul Cezanne

fernsandmoss:

Andy Goldsworthy, Frost Leaf Patch, Clapham, Yorkshire, December of 1979


Welcome to the companion blog to the art show The Natural World: A Post-Modern Perspective. Thank you to everyone who will be investing their time in the happenings of this very exciting upcoming exhibit. It will explore the link between the creative process and the natural world in which the act of making occurs. It will examine the conceptual inspiration provided by the very world in which we live. It will excite the psychic connection we as humans have to nature by celebrating that eternal bond through the beauty of artistic expression. The natural world is something that each and every one of us has a child-like dependence on. By focusing on something so basic and by highlighting the oft-overlooked details of nature’s sweeping influence, the people behind this exhibit hope to kindle thoughtful reflection in their audience. With this in mind, we all proceed forward on a journey to January 22, when the show is finally on display. For details, please go to http://www.msmary.edu/College_of_liberal_arts/fine-arts/Art-Exhibition.html or http://www.facebook.com/EmergingArtistsExhibit.
In the meantime, I plan to introduce you to the critical context of the show by presenting key artists that reflect the creative routes taken in response to thematic elements of nature. Check back weekly for updates… and now we inaugurate our crossing with the work of Andy Goldsworthy.
Ephemeral, thoughtful, complex, transitory. Goldsworthy’s intricate works are representative of the Earth Works genre. Often small scale, his sculptural creations are documented only by photographs, a time capsule into the ever-changing dynamic of nature’s processes. The hand of humankind in this process is, ultimately, overrun and deteriorated by the cyclical and seasonal tides that bind all of nature together as one. What begins as dust returns to dust, and Goldsworthy’s works embody this conservationist ideal quite perfectly. His works show the hand of the artist inasmuch as that hand is constrained by the time effects of the world in which it functions. He uses only natural, sustainable, found materials in his works - as here, where he creates a circle, a symbol of rebirth and eternalness, out of frost-encrusted leaves. When the sun comes up, the work of art will be gone; the hand of the artist, of humankind, is swallowed up by something so much greater than the individual creator. A forceful commentary on human dependency, Goldsworthy documents the sheer strength and beauty of the natural world.

fernsandmoss:

Andy Goldsworthy, Frost Leaf Patch, Clapham, Yorkshire, December of 1979

Welcome to the companion blog to the art show The Natural World: A Post-Modern Perspective. Thank you to everyone who will be investing their time in the happenings of this very exciting upcoming exhibit. It will explore the link between the creative process and the natural world in which the act of making occurs. It will examine the conceptual inspiration provided by the very world in which we live. It will excite the psychic connection we as humans have to nature by celebrating that eternal bond through the beauty of artistic expression. The natural world is something that each and every one of us has a child-like dependence on. By focusing on something so basic and by highlighting the oft-overlooked details of nature’s sweeping influence, the people behind this exhibit hope to kindle thoughtful reflection in their audience. With this in mind, we all proceed forward on a journey to January 22, when the show is finally on display. For details, please go to http://www.msmary.edu/College_of_liberal_arts/fine-arts/Art-Exhibition.html or http://www.facebook.com/EmergingArtistsExhibit.

In the meantime, I plan to introduce you to the critical context of the show by presenting key artists that reflect the creative routes taken in response to thematic elements of nature. Check back weekly for updates… and now we inaugurate our crossing with the work of Andy Goldsworthy.

Ephemeral, thoughtful, complex, transitory. Goldsworthy’s intricate works are representative of the Earth Works genre. Often small scale, his sculptural creations are documented only by photographs, a time capsule into the ever-changing dynamic of nature’s processes. The hand of humankind in this process is, ultimately, overrun and deteriorated by the cyclical and seasonal tides that bind all of nature together as one. What begins as dust returns to dust, and Goldsworthy’s works embody this conservationist ideal quite perfectly. His works show the hand of the artist inasmuch as that hand is constrained by the time effects of the world in which it functions. He uses only natural, sustainable, found materials in his works - as here, where he creates a circle, a symbol of rebirth and eternalness, out of frost-encrusted leaves. When the sun comes up, the work of art will be gone; the hand of the artist, of humankind, is swallowed up by something so much greater than the individual creator. A forceful commentary on human dependency, Goldsworthy documents the sheer strength and beauty of the natural world.

(via vmburkhardt)